Recruitment Drive

I am currently looking for three athletes who would be interested in my online coaching services at a reduced price that I can review as a case study on for my podcast and blog.

The three athletes personal details including name will be kept private as all I want to share is the process, the direction we are taking and the highs and lows as we build towards your goal.

This is a great opportunity to have good quality coaching for only $50 a month.

Coaching Services Include

• 100% custom training programs that are based around your goals, family, work and lifestyle. This is very personal.
• Ironman, 70.3, Olympic and sprint distance athletes accepted.
• All levels catered for.
• Unlimited access to me via email, phone and Skype.
• Regular feedback.
• Video analytics.
• Access to the Train Smooth private Facebook group.
• Athletes accepted from anywhere in the world.
• Updates and changes to your program if and when needed.
• Help and assistant with injuries and rehab if needed.

$50 a month

** Only three spots avlable** 

 

How to join

Please email tim@trainsmooth.com with some information about yourself.

Pricing & Payment

Please note that all prices are set in Australian dollars. All payments are to be made via PayPal Subscription.

 

If we were to look in your fridge

I have cut up questions I have asked pro triathletes from an old media website I use to have.  Each week I will post a new question.  

 

LUKE MCKENZIE

Lot’s of fruit and veg and a lot of liquid! Plenty of water and all sorts of juices. There isn’t really much “naughty” stuff in there

 

Elly Frank
Vegemite, Berries, cheese, lots of fresh food, and milk. I love milk! Just don’t look in the cupboard because that’s where my lollies stash is kept

 

RONNIE SCHILDKNECHT

Chocolate, Coffee beans, Milk, Yoghurt and Cheese.

 

MELISSA HAUSCHILDT

Bread, milk, baby spinach.

 

IAN MIKELSON

Hahaha… well seeing as I am in between training locations right now, and staying with family, I don’t really have a fridge I can call my own. But I do my best to try and eat halfway intelligently. I like a few certain veggies (sweet potatoes, squash, mushrooms, peppers, spinach) and always try to keep some good fruit around (bananas, apples, berries). Unfortunately I have a serious problem with cereal and thus I try not to buy it and stick to oatmeal. I also try to eat a fair amount of brown rice and quinoa. COFFEE is a big part of my life and most days don’t start without it. I try to keep red meat to a minimum but grew up as quite a carnivore, so that is tough, so I typically eat it once or twice a week and get most of my protein from eggs, salmon and chicken.

 

GINA CRAWFORD

Probably nothing as I tend to eat all the best stuff as soon as it is bought!! Haha! There will always be some organic milk in there though for my protein smoothies.

 

JOHAN BORG

Food and lots of it.

 

CLAYTON FETTELL

Very little, I live across the road from Whole Foods in Boulder Colorado.

 

Matty White

Lots of fruit and veg from my garden and homemade pasta sauce which my wife makes!

 

SIMON COCHRANE

Meat, Veges, Fruit, Eggs, Yoghurt, Orchard Gold Frozen Berries, Red Wine, Dark Chocolate.

 

PHILIP GRAVES

Lots of Yoghurt and Milk, i could live off Muller fruit corners!

 

RICHIE CUNNINGHAM

Food

 

JOSH AMBERGER

Bulk leftovers. My Mums is a compulsive cook & my Dad is a chef. Nothing is ever in short supply and there’s always a myriad of things to snack or feast on. I also eat a lot of fruit, so expect some fructose goodness.

 

RICHARD WHITFIELD

Greek yogurt and bluebirds (do love a good smoothie)

 

GUY CRAWFORD

Pasta from last night, yogurt, chocolate if it’s hot and melting on the bench, Milk (low fat cause I watch my figure.. lol), beet-root, cheese, a meat of some sort for tonight’s dinner…and then there’s all Kate’s vege’s and fruit and stuff.. Oh and you’ll find sauces… I love sauces…we have like 10 half empty containers…(my bad).

 

JOSH RIX

Eggs, lots of eggs. Smoked Salmon. Cheese. Yoghurt. Coke. San Pelligrino mineral water. Milk. Chocolate milk. Butter. Cream. Blueberries.

 

JAMES HODGE

Nothing out of the usual, I need to work on my nutrition. Milk is definitely always in there for making my protein shakes after training.

 

Levi Maxwell

SALAD, WHOLMEAL BREAD, SKIM MILK, MEAT, TUNA, SALMON, VEGGIES, APPLES AND BANANAS, JAM AND MOST IMPORTANTLY NUTELLA!

 

MICHAEL LOVATO

A lot of food! We eat a ton of fresh food, and will often stop by Whole Foods to purchase prepared food items – this is essential in big training blocks, when we may not have the energy to cook a proper meal. We do love to cook, but sometimes we just can’t muster the strength. Currently the fridge has the following: kale “superfood” salad with acai dressing, carne asada, mashed sweet potatoes, turkey meat, Udi’s bagels, coconut milk, yogurt, lots of berries,eggs, hummus, carrots, fresh lettuce/ kale/ romaine. Really, the list goes on and on and on. Groceries are our biggest expense!

What are your favourite training sessions for each discipline?

I have cut up questions I have asked pro triathletes from an old media website I use to have.  Each week I will post a new question.  

 

LUKE MCKENZIE

My favourite swim sessions is our weekly Wednesday mornings at Noosa main beach doing Ins & outs with the surf club guys. The Tuesday morning bunch ride is a really good hit out with a strong group of cyclists and my Sunday long runs in the Noosa National park can’t be beat!

 

Elly Frank
Swim: A great set for when I’m solo is a change of pace set. A constant 1500m made up of: 50 easy/50 moderate/50 hard x 10.I’m actually wishing I had done more of that session recently. I’ve been so caught up in getting in and swimming at the 1 speed!

Bike/Run: 90mins-2 hours on wt with some nice long efforts. (10 mins/9 mins/8 mins/7 mins/6 mins/5 mins etc.) Followed by a build run (10k).

 

RONNIE SCHILDKNECHT

In swimming it is short 100m sprints as long as it is in a group. Biking it is a 4h ride with two 12km passes in the middle of the ride. Running its again a group workout on the track. 10*800m! I love it!

 

MELISSA HAUSCHILDT

Swim – wednesday night speed/lactate session. This is my shortest swim session for the week but by far the hardest. I really feel like I’ve done something after this session.
Bike – I have two favourites. Wednesday morning hilly ride. At the time I hate it but I love the feeling after I’ve completed it. I also time myself going up the mountain so I like the challenge of racing the clock. And Saturday club ride. This is my long ride. I leave my house before 4am and ride 30km to meet my cycling club. Then I’m in for a 100km smash fest where all the boys are constantly trying to punish each other. Then I’ll ride home.
Run – Tuesday night I do my faster than race pace session with Jared. It hurts!!!

 

IAN MIKELSON

The refueling after :-)!! In all honesty I have a real love/hate relationship with most of the really challenging sessions. That is, while I may dread the hour and forty minute run with a big chunk of tempo in it, I usually take the most satisfaction from that session. Likewise, a tough swim session with say 5×400 at a high effort may give me pause while on the deck, but walking out to the car after, I feel the most satisfaction from the good hard effort. The same goes for cycling, and it is usually the mid range (3-4hr) rides with some good hard efforts in them that I enjoy the most.

 

GINA CRAWFORD

Swim Set of 15 200’s. Increasing in pace. So for example 5 on 3 min, 4 on 2.55, 3 on 2.50, 2 on 2.45, 1 flat out. Change to suit your own pace.
Bike Hill reps. 6 by approx 10 mins. 1 steady (stay seated to work quad strength), 1 med, 2 hard, 1 med, 1 steady (staying seated).
Run Some kind of fartlek session with sprints and hard intervals of various lengths. I much prefer to do this on the beach rather than on the track.

 

JOHAN BORG

Long runs and rides in the hills and open water swims.

 

CLAYTON FETTELL

Swim- surfing with the boys.
Bike- anything on the bike but a road race or crit is always fun.
Run- long runs alone with music

 

Matty White

Run – I really enjoy hitting the treadmill for a solid hour of power. I just set the treadmill at 18kmh and crank the tunes and get in the zone, I don’t have to think too much or stop for traffic lights so its easy on the mind.

Bike – I have been working with a couple of new sponsors of late Wattbike and ATS altitude technology systems, I have been using the altitude simulation at about 3400m and do a 3hr Wattbike session with 4x20min strength efforts trying to hold about 260 watts….and at about 12 percent oxygen its not fun!

Swim – I tend to swim how I feel depending how hard my bike and run sessions are, I don’t see the point of flogging myself in the pool when I am tired as it only creates bad stroke mechanics. I really enjoy swimming open water at West Lakes where I swim with a friend of mine who paces me through the session, nothing beats race simulation training.

 

SIMON COCHRANE

Swim – Ocean swim in the summer. Long relaxed aerobic swim.
Bike – 200km loop around the Coromandel. Awesome views with 2000m of climbing. Good Honest ride.
Run – Threshold intervals. Nice even burn between the legs and lungs!

 

PHILIP GRAVES

Swimming i would say a long endurace set, something thats really challenging, like 60 x 100s. When you get to the end you feel you have achieved something

Cycling i would say my long threshold ride, i have a 140km loop i do and i just ride it at best pace, it has 1000m of climbing in it and my best is 3h 35min

Running wise, i just like my long run, nothing like popping the ipod on and just jogging in some nice countryside

 

RICHIE CUNNINGHAM

swim – 2k time trial
bike – anything with a lot of hills and climbing
run – Teller Farm workout – it’s a hilly 10 mile tempo run

 

JOSH AMBERGER

On the swim, I like this main set…

400- 300 solid (s) 100 hard (h)
300- 200 s 100 h
200- 100 s 100 h
100- 100 h
100- 100 h
200- 100 h 100 s
300- 100 h 200 s
400- 100 h 200 s

On the cycle, I like nothing better than a solo long ride. 5 hours minimum, just me, the countryside, mountains and good music. A bakery stop is mandatory.

On the run, I’ve got some mountains that I like to run up at a threshold pace for strength. It’s always a nice view from the top, but a brutal session with at least 30mins of tempo up a 5-10% gradient.

 

RICHARD WHITFIELD

Swim: I love paddles, pool buoy, and band. I do a lot of my swimming like this to build strength in my shoulders.
Bike: FTP sets, they might only be short and hard but when working at 120% of FTP you know you have worked hard.

Run: My long run, I have been running off feel in the last few weeks. No watch and not stressing about minute mile ect. What I have found that I am running faster. I normally download IMTalk and listen to that, and just switch off. Off road running doesn’t do it for me, also I think you should train as you would race.

 

ANDI BOECHERER

Swim:
5 x 600m
1. 3. 5. pull break 15”
2. 3x 200m starting every 2:30
4. 6x 100m starting every 1:20

Bike:
3h on the tribike including 3x 10′ overgeared and after 30′-45′ easy riding 3x 5′ all out.

Run:
15-25x 1km 1 @ IM pace 1 @ IM 70.3 pace with my wife on the bike as company..

If we were to look in your fridge, what would we find?
A lot of fresh vegetables !

 

GUY CRAWFORD

Swimming: Would be 30×100’s on a short rest cycle.. I love sets based on 100’s.. However i don’t just do 100’s…

Cycling: Depending on what the weathers doing. (yep i’m soft and don’t like wet days)… Long ride in the hills…. But my favourite session is my river loop about 75km with about as many coffee shop stops…. Love the coffee…

Running: Trials and loops…. (I don’t like out and backs)

 

JOSH RIX

I like doing 10 x 400m in the pool because its like an Ironman Swim.. especially if I do some with the Pull Buoy and Paddles on my hands.
On the bike, I like doing strength hill repeats.
My favorite run session is either my long run, anything up to 35km, or getting on the track and doing some speed such as 8 x 1km repeats descending a couple of seconds each rep.

 

JAMES HODGE

My favourite set for each leg is when I get to train with other people. Swim would have to be 5x400m for main set, the ride I just hammer myself all the time so it does not change and for the run I like doing 6x1km with minimal rest.

 

Levi Maxwell

SWIM WOULD BE 100S SPEED SET, RIDE WOULD BE AT GEELONG WITH MY COACH AND RUN ALL THE TIME

 

MICHAEL LOVATO

Swimming: I love a nice 5k swim, with a group or with two key swim partners. My idea of fun in the pool involves a challenging main set of around 3k, where the rest is short and I attempt to negative split – one of my weakness in the water! I like basic, such as 10×300. With cycling I love to ride up one of Boulder’s long canyons, doing a combination of big gear (low cadence) intervals, followed by some time trials on the flats. My little group of training partners and I will often do pursuit-style starts, so we can chase (and run from) one another. I love running a longer session of 15 or so miles, with 4×2 miles at or below my half marathon pace. These force proper pacing, and they give me great confidence for upcoming races.

What does your average training week look like?

I have cut up questions I have asked pro triathletes from an old media website I use to have.  Each week I will post a new question.  

 

LUKE MCKENZIE

My training doesn’t necessarily follow the same pattern week in week out but I generally train between 25-35 hours a week which includes swim, bike, run and gym work.

 

Elly Frank
My week is a combination of social sessions and key sessions. I am very aware of perceived effort- My easy is very easy, while my hard sessions I like to really push. I mix it up so it’s not the same every week. I aim to have a solid swim and a social swim. I do a long ride, a social ride with friends, and a solid ride either road or WT and a brick session. I really believe in wind trainer sessions to work on my threshold level for 70.3’s and Ironmans. I also do a long run, threshold runs or track, and the social runs where I’m chatting with friends.

 

RONNIE SCHILDKNECHT

I would say 20hours in average over the full year. I also tend to do much more quality know as I get older with 32 ( – :

 

MELISSA HAUSCHILDT

I do 6-7 swim session a week covering about 20-25km. 4-5 of these are with a swim squad under coaches Brendan Capell & Zane King. I’m on the bike 6 times a week. This includes one long ride, one hilly ride and one tempo/TT session. About 500-600km is my weekly mileage. I run 6 days a week, including a faster than race pace session, a threshold session and a long run. Plus some easier runs and brick sessions. I will run about 70km/week. Jared (my partner) and I work out my training program with regards to the bike and run.

 

IAN MIKELSON

Some swimming, running and cycling. 😉 Hahaha… I would say that my training weeks are fairly common, no real secrets or crazy workouts. Consistency is the main theme. So on average my weeks usually contain 5-6 swims, 5-7 run sessions, and 4 to 5 cycling sessions. I am a member of the Triathlon Squad under Paulo Sousa (https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Triathlon-Squad/183206021698840) and we have month long training camps in different locales around the US throughout the year. During those camps training picks up a little, but not so much different than the rest of the year.

 

GINA CRAWFORD

My training has changed dramatically since the birth of my baby Benji in July 2011. Before that I was doing around 30-35 hr per week. Now I am doing around 20 hr per week with some big weeks of 24 hrs. I am more focused in training and every time I go out I have a specific goal of what I am trying to achieve. I coach myself and am flexible and work around my little boys needs. If I don’t get a lot of sleep some weeks I change what I am doing. I don’t get nearly the amount of sleep I used to get and am still breast feeding so it is important for me to be flexible with my training in order to stay healthy and have the energy levels required to make the most of the training I do. It is working for me. I am feeling fitter than ever and am beating all my previous times.

 

JOHAN BORG

Leading up to ironman a good week would involve 20-25h 3-4 swims (8-12km) 4-5rides (350-500km) 5-6 runs (70-90km).

 

CLAYTON FETTELL

Swim 20-30 bike 600-1000 run 80-120

 

Matty White

Due to working full time as a fire fighter my weeks change depending on the work. Sometimes we might have a busy night at work (saving cats, babies and old ladies from burning infernos!) So my next day’s training will be modified accordingly. While I was in the US on leave my training was about 120km running, 5-600km bike and about 15-20km swimming. I try to maintain these distances weekly with a rest day mixed in.

 

SIMON COCHRANE

Average week includes about: 5-6 sessions in each discipline, 2 x body maintenance sessions including: Gym strength/Core/Yoga/Stretching. (24-32hrs total)
Every 4 weeks I include a lower volume week.

 

PHILIP GRAVES

It really depends on the season, during the winter im doing upto 36/40h a week. In the summer il put in more intensity so obviously its not possible to do that massive milage but i am still up at 32/33h a week if im not racing. At the moment in january im running 70 miles a week, riding 300 miles a week and swimming about 15miles a week

 

RICHIE CUNNINGHAM

I average about 35 hours per week of training. During the winter I try to do higher run mileage and in the summer I do a lot more bike miles.

 

JOSH AMBERGER

Between 30-35 hours of trainings. In terms of totals, it’s about 15-20km of swimming, 500-600km of cycling and 70-90km or running. All of this is mostly aerobic work and not too much intensity. Over the years I’ve learned to back off intensity because it kills my longevity throughout the season. I’m also doing 2 pilates sessions for core strength and to promote good biomechanics throughout all three legs.

 

RICHARD WHITFIELD

I swim four mornings a week. from endurance sets too threshold sets (which are not my favourites)

Bike, in winter I do lots of FTP work on my computrainer. Based in the UK It was a struggle to get long rides in. Now it’s summer I have a long ride on a Tuesday. I ride 2.5easy then meet up with chaingang which is another 2.5 at a real solid tempo. Saturday I ride from 4hrs up to 6.5hrs all above IM pace.

Wednesday I ride 2hrs tempo with a runoff, Wednesday night I ride 2hrs real easy.
Run, I run 5 times a week. One long run 2/2.5hrs with changing of pace in the middle. it can involve 10k pace, HIM pace, then back tp IM pace. I have a double run day on a Monday, 1hr easy then 1hr of threshold in the evening.

 

ANDI BOECHERER

In average 4 swim sessions, 5 bike rides and 6 runs + 2 times wheight training and most important core work every second day.

 

GUY CRAWFORD

Depending on the time of year, but at the moment 20k of swimming 450k riding and 60-70k of running.
I built back into this over a 3 week period.

 

JOSH RIX

I usually swim about 5 times a week, totalling around 20km…. then on the bike i like to do 2 longer rides over 150km and then 2 shorter harder rides that are strength focussed. On the run I usually do between 80km-100km a week…. I have one big long running day and then a couple of runs off the bike and also a tempo run.

 

JAMES HODGE

I don’t record any of my training formally or follow a training schedule. I just simply get up in the morning and decide if I am going to go for a ride, run or swim depending on how I feel. But typically I do about three swims per week, between 4-6 runs including speed sets, and about 300km on the bike.

 

Levi Maxwell

FROM 20-35HOURS DEPENDING ON WHERE IM AT.

 

MICHAEL LOVATO

Typically I swim six days a week, aiming for 24,000 meters total. My cycling varies greatly based on weather (winter!), but I will aim for a minimum of four days, and a maximum of six. I find that I can do a lot with five days of riding, totaling about 280-300 miles. The running will most often be 45-65 miles, depending on the time of year – and I like to run six days per week (often one day of double runs). The total hours weekly are generally from 24-30. I don’t count the gym sessions in there, but I try to do a couple 45-60minute sessions.

What thoughts and influences contribute to making the decision to go Pro? Was this a difficult decision to make?

Each week I am posting a number of questions I have asked pro triathletes from an old media business I use to own.

 

LUKE MCKENZIE

I was part of the Australian Institute of Sport program when I was a junior and living and training in France in 2001 & 2002 gave me a taste of going pro full time. In 2003 I traveled to the USA and based in San Diego and found I was more competitive at the Non-Drafting format and switched my focus from ITU and Olympic selection aspirations to ultimately Half Ironman and Ironman.

 

Elly Frank

Everyone has different reasons for going Pro. Unfortunately being top 50 in the world doesn’t make you rich like in some sports! Pro status doesn’t mean you can tell your boss what you really think and throw away the stilettos. Most Pros work or focus on generating sponsors and this takes a lot of time also. For some people the style of racing age group suits their strengths and they can win as an age grouper but perform poorly when incorporated into the pro race tactics.

For me it was about the competition and opportunity to race a lot and see the world. In my first Ironman I placed in my age group at Kona, and then raced Ironman Australia and won my age group by over half an hour. That was enough for me to want to race in the Pro category, even if it meant getting hooped occasionally! I think the level of competition in female triathlons has dramatically improved in the last 3-4 years.

A small percentage can make a living out of it. Some prize money here and there and building a reputation definitely helps fund the lifestyle. A lot of athletes who gain their pro licence are lost in the numbers for a while, but having to wait 2 years to switch back to age group again is a deterrent.

Triathlon is not generally a sport you can become the best overnight, and I think more age groupers who are eligible should step up if they are mentally ready for the challenge of racing pro and the self-inflicted pressure. At the end of the day, the sun will keep coming up each day, and it’s what makes you happy.

 

RONNIE SCHILDKNECHT

My parents always pushed school so when I got the chance to join the ewz power team and get my first team paycheck in 2002 I was far from making a living out of it but I was starting as a pro. During the next 9 years I all ways studied next to training and racing. Also I worked my way up inside the team with wins at Ironman Zurich. So I really just turned full time pro last year when I finished my Bachlor in Communications. Because of my free time now I started with a bit of coaching now because I really like to help athletes reaching their goals and sharing my experiences.

 

MELISSA HAUSCHILDT

My very first half ironman (Gold Coast Half IM) I raced elite and won beating many top pro triathletes so the decision was not a hard one.

 

IAN MIKELSON

I had gotten to a point (and trust me I say this not to boast) where I was doing pretty well at most races and just figured the step up in the competition level would do me good. I had qualified for my professional license early in 2009, but I really didn’t know it or even think about it. After racing Kona that year, it became much more of a reality to me, and I decided to give it a shot. It was not really that tough of a decision for me because I was still working full time as an attorney. So I didn’t have the pressure to “make a living” from the sport. I thrived on the competition and loved racing so it was somewhat of a “no-brainer” for me. Making the leap to full time training and racing, and leaving the desk job behind (& steady paycheck) behind was a much weightier decision.

 

GINA CRAWFORD

I started with the short races and then within a couple of months I was up to doing a standard distance race and the second one I did I won. I got a coach and started training around 15 hr a week while still working 3 jobs (as a high school maths teacher, teaching the violin, and playing in the Christchurch Symphony Orchestra). The next year I did a whole lot of racing in the standard distance event and won most of them. I started to think I could maybe foot it with the professionals, and left my job as a high school Maths teacher but continued with my other 2 jobs. I knew it was a risk but for me I want to live my life without regrets. My goal turned towards doing an ironman (1st one was March 2007). In New Zealand there is no professional licence as such and so I just believed that I could get in the top 10 and wanted to win some money for my efforts so entered as a pro. I came 5th. After that I raced always as a pro and still worked a bit on the side. My first ironman win came in September 2007 and now I have 9 iron distance titles and am looking for my tenth.

 

JOHAN BORG

I did Ironman NZ in 2010 as my first ironman and won my age group and finished just outside the top 10. After that a few people told me to consider getting my pro licence. After NZ I really wanted to do Ironman WA at the end of the year but hadn’t signed up. But by getting my pro licence I would be able to do it. So I applied and it went through. Unfortunately I couldn’t do the race because I got injured before. Looking back it might have been a bit early to get my pro licence but I recon I’v gotten more long term benefits from the extra experience of racing in the pro field instead of doing well in age group.

 

CLAYTON FETTELL

I always wanted to be a professional sportsman, and in my late teens I started to see promising signs that I had something, and knew what I wanted.

 

Matty White

I first chose to go pro in my early 20s after quitting my job I moved to the gold coast to train with Col Stewarts squad which was jam packed with all the big names at the time. I figured that I was young enough to have a good crack at living the dream and it was totally my decision. Being a professional sportsperson has always been a dream of mine so it wasn’t a hard decision.

 

SIMON COCHRANE

I had a few consecutive age-group wins, had qualified and raced at the Hawaii World Champs a couple of times. It was a tough decision to make the step up but it had always been my dream to race Ironman as a Professional. My theory is you never know until you try, I have had a few top-10 finishes in my first Pro season so I think I have validated my decision with some good consistent racing and continually learning and improving each time. I’m only 28 and the top guys are pushing hard right up past 40 now.

 

PHILIP GRAVES

Not really, i won Ironman Uk and 70.3 UK in 2009 whilst i was in my 2nd year of university so after finishing my 3rd year of my History degree it was the natural path to take.

 

RICHIE CUNNINGHAM

As a kid, I always wanted to be a pro athlete. After my brother introduced me to triathlon, I knew that was what I wanted to do, but I joined the military right after that so I didn’t get to chase that dream until 6 years later. It was an easy decision to go pro, but it took me 10 years as a pro to become successful. The hard part was surviving as a pro.

 

JOSH AMBERGER

Not to sound condescending or anything but I don’t really consider myself professional. Being a pro means making a good living, and that’s something that has become few and far between amongst Australian athletes. While I don’t have a full time job and I dedicate all my time to sport (apart from part-time study), I think acutally ‘turning pro’ is a few years away. I have some loyal sponsors, and I’m currently building on these relationships. At the moment, I’m doing okay, but as I said, I wouldn’t call myself professional just yet.

Aside from this, I’ve always been at the pointy end of high performance sport, be that swimming or running when I was younger, or Triathlon in latter years. It was an organic decision to dedicate myself to racing at the highest level.

 

RICHARD WHITFIELD

I had talked to my coach Russell Cox about it last season. When racing I was placing well in races and beating pros. The real turning point, I came off my bike 3weeks out of IM Wales. I was sat in a Spanish hospital after breaking my collar bone. I made up my mind at that point thinking, what have I got to lose.

 

ANDI BOECHERER

After school I went directly to university to study Mathematics and I started to train more and improved really quickly. That time my girlfriend and me decided to start a family. After finishing 7th at the Ironman European Championships and completing a bacchelor I just wasn’t able to handle all three family, university and my sporting carreer so I quit university and concentrated on triathlon. And I was absolutely happy to spend a lot of time with our little taughter Paula and see her grow up and discover the world every single day.

 

GUY CRAWFORD

Funny you ask I just ran a seminar on this the other week.
•Choosing the right time
•Getting a results database
•Age group/ pro racing are very different
•Be smart, keep working, Patience. you can still work and race, you don’t have to drop everything
•Start planning now.
•The plan to go bankrupt slowly isn’t a good one. ie: saving up to turning pro isn’t going to pay the bills
•Other things to consider: Sponsors, cash flow, travel

 

JOSH RIX

I had been getting faster and scoring some wins in my local triathlon series, in the Open Elite category, so once I had finished my university degree I guess the competitive nature I have inside me got the better of me and I just wanted to try and see if I was capable of making it as a professional.

 

JAMES HODGE

To be honest I did not think I would be going pro for a long time, as I did not think I could be at that level for a long time considering all my other commitments. But after my race at the Coles Bay 100 I decided to apply for my pro licence which I got granted the next week. The decision to go pro was one of the easiest decisions I have ever made, as I had always dreamt of racing against the other pros that I had looked up to for so long and getting the pro licence was the only way to race them.

 

MICHAEL LOVATO

It took me seven years of racing in the age group ranks before I felt that I was competitive enough to race pro. In fact, several of the guys who I was beating in my age group had turned pro before me. I wanted to make sure that I was not making the move prematurely. I had some success at the top of the half ironman ranks – from an overall amateur standpoint – and even entered T2 at Kona within the top 20 overall. But even those successes did not give me the confidence that I could contend in the pro ranks. I finally made the jump after determining that racing head-to-head with the best was going to be the best way to make myself better.

 

 

 

 

 

CHALLENGE MOGÁN GRAN CANARIA PRO LIST

CHALLENGE MOGÁN GRAN CANARIACHALLENGE MOGÁN GRAN CANARIA

Date: 21st April 2018

Pro Men

1 ALISTAIR BROWNLEE

4 ERIC WATSON

5 JACEK TYCZYNSKI

6 KACPER ADAM

7 ALISTAIR EECKMAN

8 JORDI GARCIA GRACIA

9 MATTHIAS KNOSSALLA

10 JENS FROMMHOLD

11 DIRK WIJNALDA

2 KÜNG MANUEL

12 MIKEL ELGEZABAL FERNÁNDEZ

14 DANIEL MUGICA CORRALES

15 STENN GOETSTOUWERS

16 WILLIAM COWEN

17 SVEN VAN LUYCK

18 THOMAS DAVIS

19 JULIAN MUTTERER

20 SANNE SWOLFS

3 HEEMERYCK PIETER

21 GEORGII KAUROV

22 JOAN RUVIRETA BRUFAU

23 STEPHEN DONNELLY

24 MAXIME VERSTRAETE

215 DAVIDE GIARDINI

214 MARK BUCKINGHAM

 

No pro females listed

Ask A Pro Triathlete

 

These are some questions I have asked pro triathletes a few years back for a publication I was working on.  I thought it would be fun to break them up into questions and post a new question each week.

 

Question:

What brought you to the sport of triathlon?

 

LUKE MCKENZIE

I grew up near Forster the original home of Ironman Australia and I would volunteer on the aid stations with my parents in the mid to late eighties. I didn’t start triathlon till 1994 but I’d seen, supported and knew about it from a young age.

 

Elly Frank
I did Noosa Triathlon for fun when I was about 20. I was on a borrowed Flat bar style mountain Bike and even though I got thrashed I loved it!

 

RONNIE SCHILDKNECHT

There was the Ironman Zurich just around the corner from my house and I entered the olympic junior race as my first triathlon. Terrible experience, I got 2nd last.

 

MELISSA HAUSCHILDT 

I was previously a runner. After several injuries I bought a bike to cross train. I enjoyed it so much I started competing in cycling races locally before my (now) manager convinced me to give triathlon a go.

 

IAN MIKELSON

I began running just as a way to stay in shape. Just because it got you 2 free beers at the beer garden after, and I ran a local 10K and ran okay. A friend who had done some triathlon in college urged me to try out triathlon and I am glad she did. I did a sprint race and was hooked.

 

GINA CRAWFORD

I was bored with my working life and needed something for me, a hobby. I hadn’t done any exercise in about 7 years and my husband encouraged me to have a go at one of the short triathlons aimed at getting women involved (200m swim, 15k bike, 3k run). That was in 2005 and I was instantly hooked on the sport.

 

JOHAN BORG

I started triathlon 7 years ago when I moved to Australia from Sweden. Back in Sweden I had done some running and mountain biking. After moving I wanted to keep that up but found that I preferred riding on the road. I then started doing some riding and running with a tri squad and thought I might as well take up swimming as well since everyone else I was training with was doing it. I did a few races and found that I was doing ok (once I got out of the water that is). After about 2 years I started taking it a bit more seriously and did a few longer races and really found my stride and from there, there was no turning back.

 

CLAYTON FETTELL

The Lennox Head triathlon, made my debut when I was 10 and haven’t looked back.

 

MATTY WHITE

I first started out in triathlons at my school in SA in year 10 at Sacred Heart College; I played AFL and Cricket at a high junior level and thought it would be a good idea as it was introduced as a school subject. I think I finished 3rd last in my first race but I was hooked and gave up all my other sports to concentrate on being good at this sport.

 

SIMON COCHRANE

I have always been competitive at a range of sports, playing rugby and racing Motocross from an early age. I was drawn to the challenge and enormity of an Ironman, I work as a Personal Trainer and have coached a few athletes at varying distances of Triathlon and running. It is a great sport for socialising and training with like-minded people, and complements a healthy lifestyle.

 

PHILIP GRAVES

I was a swimmer/runner from an early age and rode to school and swimming every day so i was already doing all 3 sports from a very early age. when i was 12 i entered an Ironkids triathlon at the local gym and from there went to a triathlon taster day with Jack Maitland and Simon Ward

 

RICHIE CUNNINGHAM

My brother got me into the sport when I was 15.

 

JOSH AMBERGER

I started swimming when I was young and quickly had success with some national titles and records. My performances started to plateau when I was about 13 and others started to mature quicker than me. I went from winning titles so not even making finals, all because overnight kids grew beards and grew upwards while I remained rather undeveloped. Naturally I began to lose interest in swimming, and because I was doing a lot of school running at the time I easily found triathlon. I loved it and it stuck.

 

RICHARD WHITFIELD

I was playing semi pro football, and I was playing in an FA cup qualifying round, I was stood on the pitch and I just thought to myself why am I doing this!

So I stopped playing. I was going to America, and In the airport I seen a triathlon magazine, I thought that sounds cool. Booked my 1st race which was London Tri.

 

ANDI BOECHERER

At the Age of 16 I started to do some mountainbiking and with 18years I did my first race and discovered my competetiv genes. The following winter I wanted to stay fit and went to the pool twice a week. I met a triathlon training squad and started to train with them. In the next summer I did my first triathlon and got hooked immediately although my running was really bad.

 

GUY CRAWFORD

Actually my friends at school and I entered a team triathlon and I barely made it through the swim section or 500m and got owned by every-one and it hit a competitive nerve in me… Since then I have been doing tri’s for fun and competitively.

 

JOSH RIX

I was actually a tennis player, but I did a lot of swimming and cross country running for my high school team and one day a schoolteacher suggested a few of us do a triathlon and I did pretty well, considering I was on a mountain bike, and so I was hooked with the sport.

 

JAMES HODGE

My first triathlon was at the start of 2006 down at Beauty Point. My mate Matt Guy asked me come along to it, where I competed in the novice race and came third. What kept me hooked is the variety of training you are able to do, it never makes the sport boring.

 

LEVI MAXWELL

MY COMPETITIVE NATURE AND PASSION FOR HEALTH AND FITNESS

 

MICHAEL LOVATO

I had been a competitive athlete my whole life – throughout my youth and in high school – and when I started college, I was not continuing with any of my previous sports (soccer, swimming, track). I was an active (weight lifting) freshman, who worked as a life guard. I was more concerned with trying to look good and impress the girls, than with competing. So naturally, when a friend pointed out that there was an intramural sprint triathlon on campus, I jumped at the chance. What better way was there to look good and impress the ladies! (Incidentally, the race kicked my butt, and not even the ladies that beat me were too impressed with my moves…)