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Frederik Van Lierde Ironman Lanzarote Nutrition Plan

Frederik Van Lierde’s Ironman Lanzarote 2019 nutrition plan looked like this:

Nutrition plan:

· 1 gel 5min before swim start

Bike:

· 1 gel + water in Bike bag 20 gr

· 4 gels on the bike 80 gr

· 1 bidon water 750ml start bike

· 3 bidons (one in special needs bag) with 750ml with 10 scoops Isotonic 300 gr

TOTAL : 400 gr sugars for 5h on the bike

Run:

· 1 gel + water in Run bag 20gr

· 2 gels during the run 40gr

· 3 small bottles with 5 scoops isotonic 150gr

TOTAL : 210 gr sugars for 3h running

To see Freddie’s Ironman training – Click Here

To visit Freddie’s website – Click Here

Frederik Van Lierde’s Ironman Training

Recently retired 2013 Ironman World Champion Frederik Van Lierde shared with Train Smooth his Ironman training program.

“I’ll give you the example of five weeks out of Lanzarote Ironman that I was able to win last year. This week was executed at home in Belgium where I live. Just mention that I raced 70.3 Campeche on 17th of March. The week in attachment is the one starting on Monday 22nd of April. Ironman Lanzarote was on 25th of May 2019.


You’ll know that every lead up is different, but this was a successful one.
And thanks to my coach Luc Van Lierde to put this together of course.”

 SwimmingCyclingRunningNotes
Monday6km 16kmR=L1A+ S=1
Tuesday4km80km B=VO2max 7.5km L2+5km L3 met 2.5km A1+ S+L1
Wednesday 60km12kmB=A1 + R =1a
Thursday3km120km B=L1a/L1b Hills + S=pull:30x100m R:10” Long slag-ext long slag
Friday4km 24kmR: L1a + S = intervals
Saturday 80km10kmB= Fartlek + R=A1
Sunday 200km B = L1a (flat)
Total Week17km540km62kmVolume

Freddie’s Tests, paces, power, heart rate

Sport/PaceRegenerationExt-LongInt-LongTempo-LongFarlekExt-IntInt-Int
RunA1L1aL1aL2L3L4L5
4:314:063:493:363:253:143:07
BikeA1L1aL1bL2L3L4L5
Bike HR9192-119120-133140149156162
Bike Watts200201-261262-292307332336378
SwimmingLong SlagLa1extLa2La3La4La5
100m+4”1:12”1:10’1:08”1:06”1:04”1:02”
200m+8”2:29”2:25”2:21”2:17”2:13”2:10”
400m+16”5:02”4:52”4:434:38”4:33”4:28”
Account swim+4”1:28”1:16”1:14”1:12”1:10”1:08”

What were the key test sessions you would do in the leadup to a big race and how far out from your race would you do the tests?

I have never been a big fan of testing but I did some lactate testing with my coach at least once a year in the month of January or February. Swim, bike and run to have my training paces. And to see how I was compared to other years. The fact that you and your coach knows your system helps a lot to analyse.
My training paces from last year after analysing lactate testing (you’ll find above).

Swim test would consist of 3 x 400m build and a 100m all out

Bike test would consist of a build up: starting at 100W for 8min, next block 140W for 8min, … until you can’t go any further. Usually in my history of testing I manages to get into the 420W block 1 to 6min. Only one time I managed to get 30sec into the 460W block.
Testing was always indoor on a trainer.

Run test always on the track. Starting with 2 x 1000m solid pace, followed by 3 x 2000m build ideally Lactate 2 – 3 -4.
In the end a 600m all out.

To visit Frederik Van Lierde’s website – Click Here

Marko Albert’s Ironman Nutrition Plan

I spoke with retired pro triathlete Marko Albert about his Ironman nutrition plan.

“My race day nutrition was kept as easy as possible. Before race start eliminate all fruits and veggies. Drink plenty of mineral water and eat simple food (lots of rice, chicken broth, so on).

Race food itself was an act of juggling my wants and needs (depending on the temperature things below were adjusted).

Race morning food was coffee and bread with jam or honey.

1bar+1gel+ 2 Saltstick capsules+ 700m simple carbohydrate rich sports drink + some clif blocks per hour. I used SIS products my entire Ironman career and carried them with me where ever I travelled”

To check out Marko’s Ironman training program – Click Here

Marko Albert Ironman Program

Marko Albert shared with Train Smooth his training program five weeks out from Ironman Hawaii.

“Five weeks out from 2016 IM Hawaii, done in Tucson (very hot in September and @800m elevation), just came from sea level and cold Estonia (took some adjusting). This week was 33.7 hours of training and was followed by 37 hour week.”

Monday:
Swim 5,8km (including 20*100m hard+ 1200m paddles medium hard)
Bike: 2h easy
Run: 1h easy mixed with drills
Gym: 1h5min (relatively heavy weights)

Tuesday:
Run: Track 10*1km @3.25/500m easy in between
Bike: 4h short hard efforts included

Wednesday:
Swim: Hard swim 6km (probably set of 12*400m)
Bike: 30min recovery
Run: 95min hilly run
Yoga: 30min

Thursday:

Swim: 3,2km (sprints)
Bike: 4.5h bike
Gym: 1h5min (relatively heavy weights)

Friday:
Swim: 5,5km relatively easy
Bike: 2h easy
Run: run+drills 1h

Saturday:
Bike: 5h with IM wattage efforts
Run: brick 25min first 15min hard (3.45-3.55km pace)
Yoga: 30min

Sunday
Swim: recovery 2km
Run: 2h

When asked about what test sessions he would do in the lead up to key Ironman races, Marko replied

“I always ran 101km @85% /500m 5 weeks out of the race and I always did some 10-12400m @threshold swims in the pool around the same time. Biking was more by the feel as the camps often took place in the different environment (Lanzarote, Altitude somewhere or…..) But if I could hold my NP around 270w for 5-6 hours easy rides I knew I was doing fine”

Marko’s website http://www.marko.ee/

Luke McKenzie’s Run Next Level

In 2013, we saw Luke McKenzie take his Ironman run to a new level. Luke’s Ironman marathon would often be 3:05 to 3:10. Around 2013 we started to see Luke’s marathon improve with his personal best being 2:49 at Ironman Wisconsin 2017.

When asked about what had changed with his run, Luke said

“In 2011-2012 I trained with Siri Lindley in Los Angeles and I spent a lot more time running at threshold than I had done in the years prior. I guess 2004-2010 I had trained the speed out of the legs with too much aerobic running. Siri had me running on the treadmill to increase turnover as well as including regular shorter more intense run efforts. I saw my bike strength drop off over that period but I was running a lot better. In 2013 when I went back to coaching myself I feel I found a good balance of bike strength while still incorporating the running at threshold.”

The key run sessions in the lead up to an Ironman for luke:

“Treadmill for turn over. Track for pacing. Hill reps for strength and durability.”

You can check out Luke’s Ironman program HERE

Luke McKenzie’s Ironman Build

Luke McKenzie shared with Train Smooth what his maximum work load 8-4 weeks out from a key Ironman events like Kona, Ironman Western Australia and Ironman Cairns looks like.

MONDAY
AM: SWIM – Squad 5km
MID AM: RIDE 60-80km inc. 60min of Strength Endurance (SE) hill reps
PM: GYM/CORE work

TUESDAY
AM: RUN: TREADMILL OR TRACK
16-24km (usually 20x3min at 800 at pace/200 float recovery or 2-3x5km at 70.3 pace/1km float rec.)
PM: SWIM – 3-4km usually paddles/pull work

WEDNESDAY
AM: SWIM/BIKE/RUN
Squad 5km (or INS/OUTS for 1hr at beach with surf club)
100-120km hilly RIDE *straight off swim
5-8km RUN *off bike

THURSDAY
AM: RIDE – Bunch 60-80km with 30min paceline effort
PM: RUN – 12-16km w/ hills reps (30-40 mins worth)

FRIDAY
AM: SWIM – Squad 5km
PM: GYM/CORE work
*Sometimes FULL DAY OFF*

SATURDAY
AM: RIDE – 150-180 inc. 80-100km @ IM watt TT effort
RUN off bike 6-10 x 1 mile (10-16km) targeting 10-15 sec/km faster than IM pace *would only do this 2-3 x MAX in a prep

SUNDAY
AM: LONG RUN 24-32km
PM: SWIM – 2km ocean with group
PM: OPTIONAL RUN 6-10km

Luke’s test sessions in the lead up to a key Ironman race

“My usual test sessions were usually about 8,6 and 4 weeks out from Ironman and it would be our Saturday Bike/Run session. It would involve riding 2x1hr TT’s (very rarely I would do 6x30min) at IM watts covering 150-180km and then running 6-10 x 1 mile efforts. I would usually aim to hold 5.45-6 min and leave on 7 mins.”

Cam Brown’s Kona Build

Looking back at professional triathlete Cam Brown’s Ironman builds. here are five different weeks Cam completed. During these times Cam would aim to peak twice a year at Ironman New Zealand and again at Ironman World Championship.

August 2003:

Mon: Swim 5.7km, Bike 140km at a medium effort and Run 10km easy

Tue: Swim 5.2km, Bike 95km and Run 18km (5x 1mile)

Wed: Bike 180km hilly and Run 11km steady

Thu: Swim 5.3km, Bike 110km (3.15min efforts), Run 17km steady

Fri: Swim 4.3km, Bike 73km easy

Sat: Bike 180km with 35km fast and Run 12.5km steady

Sun: Bike 95km medium effort and Run 25km medium effort

Total: Swim 20.5km – Bike 875km – Run 98km

February 2004

Mon: Swim 5.9km, Bike 103km hilly and run 9.5km easy

Tue: Swim 5.6km, Bike 71km and Run 20km (3x 800 + 8x 400)

Wed: Bike 170km steady and Run 12km medium effort

Thur: Swim 5.5km, Bike 78km hilly and Run 18km with 20min of hill repeats

Fri: Bike: 201km medium effort and Run 7.5km medium effort)

Sat: Bike 40km easy and Run 33km moderate

Sun: Bike: 75km and Run 13km easy

Total: Swim 17km – Bike – 738km – Run 113km – Total training time: 36.30 hrs

September 2004

Mon: Swim 5km, Bike 108km and Run 11.5km

Tue: Swim 5.2km, Bike 50km and Run 21km (30min fast)

Wed: Bike 203km and Run 10km medium effort

Thur: Swim 5km, Bike 80km (easy to moderate) and Run 21km (2x 800 + 4x 1600)

Fri: Swim 5km, Run 11km and Run 9km easy

Sat: Swim 3km, Bike 184km (35km fast) and Run 15.5km

Sun: Bike: 69km and Run 35km

Totals: Swim: 23.5km, Bike: 693km, Run 135km “Total Hours: 38.40hrs

September 2005

Mon: Swim: 5.1km and Bike 174km

Tue: Swim: 5.4km and Bike 106km (60km fast), Run 20km hilly

Wed: Bike: 156km, Run 14km brick run and weight training

Thur: Swim: 5.2km and Bike 60km easy and run 21.5km (3x 3km efforts)

Fri: Swim: 5.3km, Run 7km easy and weight training

Sat: Bike: 222km and 12km brick run

Sun: Bike: 45km easy and run 35km

Totals: Swim 21km, Bike 763km, Run 110km

August 2007

Mon: Swim 5.2km, Bike 136km and run 10km easy

Tue: Swim 5.2km, Bike 52km easy, Run 21km

Wed: Bike 193km

Thur: Swim: 4.5km, Bike 91km and Run 21km (30min fast)

Fri: Run 13.5km

Sat: Swim 4km, Bike 214km (2x 20min fast) and Run 7km

Sun: Bike 43km and Run 34km

Total: Swim 18.9km – Bike 730km – Run 107km

Scott Smith’s Marathon Program

Professional US marathon runner Scott Smith has a personal best time of 2:11 marathon.

Below is a typical week of training with most of his weekly volume done at an easy effort.

Monday: AM: Easy 10 miles – PM: Easy 4 miles

Tuesday: AM: Easy 8 miles – PM: Easy 4 miles with drills and strides

Wednesday: AM: Track sessions – something like 20x 400m with 200m easy jog for recovery

Thursday: AM: Easy 10 miles

Friday: AM: Leg Speed session – something like repeats of 300m, 200m, 100m with 200m easy jog between – PM: Easy 4 miles with drills and strides

Saturday: Long runs – Scott’s long runs are often a mix bag and rarely the same session is repeated. One week Scott will have 2 min surges every mile of running and other long runs could be last 5km done fast.

Sunday: Easy 8 miles (it is common to see Saturday and Sunday swapped around and Scott doing his long run on the Sunday)

Leg Speed & Ground Contact Time

The two biggest things that stick out when reviewing Scott’s training logs are the relentless focus of leg speed and to reduce ground contact time.

Just about every week you will see one or two sessions with shorter faster efforts like 200m fast, 200m easy or 10 x 60sec fast hill repeats with the main focus being leg speed.

Also twice a week Scott will do two sessions that contain run drills and will finish with some strides.

5 key sessions from Tim Kerrison

Tim Kerrison is the head performance coach at Team Ineos and has been responsible for all of the team’s Tour de France wins including Bradley Wiggins, Chris Froome, Geraint Thomas and Egan Bernal and has also been coaching Ironman professional Cam Wurf.

I have been following Tim’s career for sometime now and here are five key sessions that have stuck out at me.

Five Key Sessions

  1. 3x 50min @ threshold – This session is used once or twice in the lead up to a grand tour. Often you will see his athletes do this session as a 4 hour ride with the main set being 3x 50min at threshold with 10min easy between. (note that this is at threshold and not sweet spot). Normally this session will take a number of weeks to build up to.
  2. High threshold in Andorra – There is a 6% clime in Andorra that takes his athletes between 38-42 minutes to ride up. The ride isn’t max effort but it is a high threshold session. I have put this in the list as it is a very common session to see for most of his athletes 6-8 weeks out from key races.
  3. Alternating cadence – Most weeks you will find sessions with this or a version of this for his athletes. Often these are done on different terrain. A high portion of his athletes invest heavily on pedal efficiency. 24min hovering at or just under threshold done as 6min/6min alternating cadence 50/85rpm followed by 24min slightly lower in power done as 6min/6min 45/90rpm
  4. Threshold with surges – A lot of the sessions Tim gives his athletes you will find surges and bursts sets ranging from 10-90sec. A common session found is 2x 40min at threshold with 10x 20sec surges to low anaerobic zone every 4min at the same power all with a high cadence between 90-100rpm.
  5. Mix UP – Mix up sessions are found multiple times each week that targets a number of different energy systems. A common session would be something like 15min hovering under threshold, 20min done as 5x 3:30min @ tempo, 30sec burst followed by 15min @ threshold, 8min @ tempo, 45min high zone two.

Summary

There are four common things when looking at training logs from the athletes Tim coaches that stick out at me.

  1. High Volume
  2. A lot of time spent at or hovering just under threshold
  3. Most sessions will have surges and burst sets
  4. An endless chase to improve peddle efficiency

Cam Wurf’s Run

In 2019 professional triathlete Cam Wurf showed some big improvements with his Ironman run with a 2:50 marathon split at Ironman Australia in May 2019.

I wanted to dig a little deeper within Cam’s run program from 1st January 2019 through to his win at Ironman Australia in May 2019 where he averaged a pace of 4:02 per km. Cam has been trying to establish his race pace to 3:47 per km that would give him a 2:40 marathon.

Looking at his training log, there are a few things that stick out.

  • Cam spends a lot of his run volume at or just around his race pace/race effort.
  • Cam’s fast efforts are very controlled and will rarely go faster than 3:15km pace and never faster than 3:00km pace. Most shorter intervals hang around the 3:25km pace.
  • Cam isn’t afraid to take a rest day or take it easy if needed.
  • During the peak run weeks, Cam was comfortably holding around 115km run weeks with 7 runs per week over five days.
  • Key weeks he would have two track sessions and a long run that would be around 30-35km holding around 4min km pace

Cam’s Week

While it can be tough to create a template Cam followed, most weeks looked something like this.

Monday: 1hr run moderate effort or often time between 4min-3:42min km pace. A treadmill was used a number of weeks for this session.

Tuesday: Track Session 15-17km most of these track runs was spending longer intervals 1-2km holding 3:25min km pace. Afternoon was a mix bag between a 2nd run or a bike or simply rest.

Wednesday: Run – 1hr depending on the week, this could be easy treadmill run or a 1hr moderate effort run holding 4min km pace or a bike and swim session.

Thursday: Long Run day between 30-35km building and holding to around 4min km pace. Afternoon was often rest however a few weeks Cam jumped on the bike or would do another run that would be all easy.

Friday: Bike – 3hrs. Afternoon a 1hr run often descending in pace to around race pace/effort.

Saturday: Track Session – 15-17km with the focus on shorter faster efforts like 14x 800m @3:30 pace with 200 easy between with some sessions will include a spike of 3:10 pace towards the end of the interval. In the afternoon would be a bike or another run.

Sunday: Often a mix bag and rarely saw the same type of session two weeks in a row. Unless Cam was traveling through the week, Sunday was mostly a recovery day, sometimes full rest, others were active recovery through swim or bike or run volume.

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